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Sex & Pregnancy

How to Have Sex During Pregnancy

Sex during pregnancy can be a freeing experience for the couple involved. It may be the first time in years that you have not been concerned about either getting pregnant or not becoming pregnant!

Sex during pregnancy can be a fun and healthy experience; there should be no need to avoid sexual activity unless your health care professional has advised against it. You can have sex right up to the time when your waters break without any risk to mother or baby. There are, however, some things that you will need to consider.

During the first trimester (weeks 1-12), nothing really needs to change in regard to your sex life. Your tummy is still small and will not factor into the physical side of things. You may, however, be feeling sick and very tired and this can put a damper on your mojo! The key here is to rest up, take it easy, and talk to your partner. Partners may have their own worries about sex at this early stage, too. Keep communication open and play things by ear.

During the second trimester (weeks 13-27), you should be feeling much better but your tummy will be sticking out a little by now but it shouldn’t be too difficult to work around. Missionary position sex might be becoming a little uncomfortable so your partner may need to keep their weight off your tummy by using their arms or it might be a good time to experiment with other positions. If your swelling tummy and pregnant body make you feel sexy, try being on top of your partner, or you can both try lying on your side to keep the weight off your growing belly. At some point during this trimester, you will feel your baby start to move. This can be a little off-putting during sex so talk to your partner if it bothers you. Be aware that your baby may become more active after orgasm—this is due to your pounding heart and the flood of feel-good hormones. It does not mean that the baby knows what is going on or that you have caused bub any discomfort.

The third trimester (weeks 28-40) is when things can really turn into a gymnastics display! The most important thing to do is to keep talking and keep your sense of humor! There is some research to suggest that those couples who remain sexually active throughout pregnancy may reduce the chance of an overdue baby. At this stage in your pregnancy when you may be starting to feel a little over it all, it may be good motivation to keep having sex! Your partner may also be concerned about hurting the baby at this stage—rest assured that all medical research indicates that the baby is well protected and has no idea what is going on. By now your tummy is well-rounded and it would be very uncomfortable for your partner to try putting their weight on your belly. Time to try out some other positions, try lying on your side with your partner behind you; this has the added benefit of keeping penetration fairly shallow which may be more comfortable. You may also want to try a sitting position which keeps the weight off you and gives you control (it might also give you killer thighs if you do it often enough).

Above all else, enjoy this time that you have together and keep communication open, talk about what you are comfortable with and any worries you may have especially if this is your first baby.

Try to remember that sex is meant to be fun and you need to keep your sense of humor, sex during pregnancy is healthy and safe and there is no reason (unless otherwise advised by a health care professional) that you cannot enjoy an active sex life during your entire pregnancy.

About Author:

Joseline Burns is a teacher and thesis help writer at educational service with over nine years of experience in the educational field. She has been writing and editing content for social media, led her own blogs for five years. She has many hobbies and she can write about everything. Her main goal—to help people with self-development, to teach them to look at the situation from different sides. Also, she is a big fan of fantasy movies, science, and psychology.

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